Podcast: QDiscovery Acquires Evidox

ACEDS Community Newsletter for the Week of November 29

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Relativity and ACEDS Announce New Reciprocal Recertification Credit Partnership
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Rob Robinson Updates His eDiscovery Market Size Mashup
Read more

The Case for Pausing in eDiscovery by Helen Stocklin-Enright, Perkins Coie (LTN)
Read more

Paralegal Hiring Anticipated for Inhouse Teams per Altman Weil CLO Survey
via Ron Friedmann
Read more

Natasha Lomas: Facebook Documents, Under Seal in Another US Case,
Seized by UK Committee
Read more

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ACEDS Affiliate News

QDiscovery Acquires Evidox
Read more

Xact Data Discovery: Starting Discovery Right, eDiscovery Competence
Series Part 2 by Matthew Verga
Read more

BIA Listed as One of Crain’s 2018 Best Places to Work in NYC
Read more

Chris Dale Interviews Karyn Harty of McCann FitzGerald on the positive
aspects of GDPR and more
Read more

Plan Your E-Discovery Day with an ACEDS and Exterro TwitterChat
Join ACEDS & Exterro to learn more and plan your E-Discovery Day activities with a
TwitterChat! Join the TwitterChat using hashtag #ediscoveryday on Friday, November 30
at 2:30 PM EST

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New ACEDS Chapters

We are excited to announce new ACEDS Chapters are being formed in Gulf Coast
(LA, MS, AL), Charleston, South Africa, Toronto, Tokyo, Seattle, Dallas, Columbus,
Atlanta, Sydney and Melbourne Australia. Please reach out to chapters@aceds.org
if you are interested in being part of the formation, steering committee, or a member.

December 3 – Detroit – Annual Holiday Party
Learn more and register here

December 4 – New York – E-Discovery Day Networking Event
Learn more and register here

December 4 – New England – E-Discovery Day “Fireside Chat”
Learn more and register here

December 4 – Jacksonville – E-Discovery Day Happy Hour
Learn more and register here

December 4 – Houston – E-Discovery Day Happy Hour
Learn more and register here

December 4 – DC – E-Discovery Day Happy Hour
Learn more and register here

December 4 – South Africa – E-Discovery Day Webinar “eDiscovery –
Are You Seeing the Whole Picture”
Learn more and register here

December 4 – Los Angeles – Chapter Launch and E-Discovery Day Celebration
Learn more and register here

December 5 – San Francisco – Trifecta Holiday Party
Learn more and register here

December 6 – UK –  eDiscovery Awards 2018
Learn more and register here

 

 

 

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Relativity and ACEDS Announce New Reciprocal Recertification Credit Partnership

Collaboration will provide both ACEDS- and Relativity-certified professionals with continuous education opportunities in e-Discovery

CHICAGO, Nov. 27, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Relativity, the industry-leaders in e-Discovery software, and the Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists (ACEDS), the premier eDiscovery educator, today announced a new partnership aimed at providing continuous education opportunities for interested members of the e-Discovery industry. The agreement is highlighted by a new reciprocal education credit program that makes it easier for e-Discovery professionals to get reciprocal Relativity Continuing Education (RCE) and Certified E-Discovery Specialist Certification (CEDS) credits by attending applicable webinars hosted by either the Relativity or ACEDS learning community.

Obtaining RCEs and CEDS credits, along with further certifications from both Relativity and ACEDS-approved tests, are vital for the continued career success and advancement of any e-Discovery professional. The new program offers current CEDS professionals and Relativity Certified Professionals with several new ways to earn credits that go towards required certifications or continued education requirements.

For the CEDS community looking to earn their CEDS Certified e-Discovery Specialist renewal or new certifications, candidates will receive 1 CEDS credit per hour of Relativity education. This includes Relativity webinars a candidate has previously attended – up to two years previously – along with currently available Relativity webinars, training, and events – such as Relativity Fest.

Mary Mack, executive director of ACEDS, said: “Continuous learning organizations sharing appropriate courses like Relativity and ACEDS allows dual-certified individuals a greater breadth of offerings, and the opportunity for one course completion to count for both certifications. ACEDS loves the Relativity community and welcomes them to our learning platform.”

For the Relativity community, certified professionals can attend a selection of ACEDS webinars containing relevant e-Discovery content such as the popular AI & Machine Learning webinar to gain continuing education credits. Eligible webinars will be easily recognizable on the ACEDS web page thanks to the Relativity logo found on the registration page.

“We’re thrilled to announce this new partnership with ACEDS and to interact more with their community,” said Danielle Urban, Manager of Certification at Relativity. “We look forward to seeing how e-Discovery professionals utilize the added flexibility and opportunity that this partnership provides.”

The process to earn these credits differs across both organizations. For CEDS credit, attendees must submit their eCertificates of relevant attendance to ACEDS. For RCE credits, attendees need to fill out this form on the Relativity website.

Click here for additional resources or information on certifications and training.

About Relativity
At Relativity, we make software to help users organize data, discover the truth, and act on it. Our e-Discovery platform is used by thousands of organizations around the world to manage large volumes of data and quickly identify key issues during litigation, internal investigations, and compliance projects. Relativity has over 180,000 users in 40+ countries from organizations including the U.S. Department of Justice, more than 70 Fortune 100 companies, and 198 of the Am Law 200. RelativityOne offers all the functionality of Relativity in a secure and comprehensive SaaS product. Relativity has been named one of Chicago’s Top Workplaces by the Chicago Tribune for seven consecutive years. Please contact Relativity at sales@relativity.com or visit http://www.relativity.com for more information.

About ACEDS
The Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists, part of leading legal education provider BARBRI, is a membership association committed to promoting and verifying eDiscovery skills and competence through training, education, and certification to organizations and individuals. The association’s goal is to help professionals and organizations reduce the costs and risks associated with eDiscovery and realize the advantages of performing it effectively. ACEDS awards the certified eDiscovery Specialist (CEDS) credential, which is held by practitioners at AmLaw 200 firms, government agencies, including the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and U.S. Justice Department, and some of the largest corporations in the world. ACEDS commitment to ongoing education is found through their global footprint of chapters where members can connect with their local community for seminars, networking events and more.

ACEDS Contact:
Cindy Parks
cindy@parkscommunications.com
913-526-6912

ACEDS Community Newsletter for the Week of November 21

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Warm Thanksgiving Wishes for Our “eDiscovery AND” Community from
Mary Mack
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Police seize iPhone, Suspect Charged for Remotely Wiping It via Steven Cook
Read more

ACEDS launches the eDiscovery Executive Certificate Program
Read more

Celebrating E-Discovery Day with Mary Mack by Tim Rollins, Exterro
Read more

ACEDS Shows Why You Need Those Stinking Badges: eDiscovery Trends by
Doug Austin, CloudNine
Read more

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ACEDS Affiliate News

UN War Crime Tribunal Secures Convictions, Uses ZyLAB Software
Read more

Relativity’s Brendan Ryan Interviews Stellar Women in e-Discovery, Rebecca Grant
Read more

Thanksgiving Recipes from Relativity
Read more

https://blog.aceds.org/warm-thanksgiving-wishes-for-our-ediscovery-and-community-from-mary-mack/

New ACEDS Chapters

We are excited to announce new ACEDS Chapters are being formed in Gulf Coast (LA,
MS, AL), Charleston, South Africa, Toronto, Tokyo, Seattle, Dallas, Columbus, Atlanta,
Sydney and Melbourne Australia. Please reach out to chapters@aceds.org if you are
interested in being part of the formation, steering committee, or a member.

December 3 – Detroit – Annual Holiday Party
Learn more and register here

December 4 – New York – E-Discovery Day Networking Event
Learn more and register here

December 4 – New England – E-Discovery Day “Fireside Chat”
Learn more and register here

December 4 – Jacksonville – E-Discovery Day Happy Hour
Learn more and register here

December 4 – Houston – E-Discovery Day Happy Hour
Learn more and register here

December 4 – DC – E-Discovery Day Happy Hour
Learn more and register here

December 4 – South Africa – E-Discovery Day Event – Save the Date – More
Information Coming Soon

December 5 – San Francisco – Trifecta Holiday Party
Learn more and register here

December 6 – UK –  eDiscovery Awards 2018
Learn more and register here

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Warm Thanksgiving Wishes for Our “eDiscovery AND” Community from Mary Mack

My Dear ACEDS and Friends Community,

We are so very grateful for the gift of your attention, your contributions to our growing global eDiscovery community, and for your support of the ACEDS mission. We thank you for giving back to the profession and to your local communities by volunteering and hosting benefits.

We celebrate our long time chapters who have successfully introduced new leadership, like our Jacksonville and Detroit chapters. We thank our chapter champions and leaders who emerged this year, from San Francisco to the Benelux. We are also excited to welcome Chicago, Los Angeles and South Africa.

We thank our affiliates, sponsors, affinity partners, and friends who make our events possible and who share their educational mission and product roadmaps so generously.

We thank our mentors, our faculty, and our students for sharing their hard won experience and research. We thank our social supporters, reporters and bloggers who amplify our community members.

I am grateful for our ACEDS and greater BARBRI team members who make all things possible.

ACEDS wishes you a peaceful, healthy, and abundant weekend.

See you CyberMonday!

Mary

Celebrating E-Discovery Day with Mary Mack

E-Discovery, as most people know, is a relatively young branch of legal practice. Depending on matters of definition, one could reasonably argue that it’s:

Without a doubt, Mary Mack, Executive Director of the Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists (ACEDS), has an exceptional perspective on the theory and practice of e-discovery that is matched by few experts in the field. From her work building one of the first cloud e-discovery solutions at Fios, Inc., to her current role as one of (if not) the leading e-discovery educators in the world, her thoughts on the history, present, and future of e-discovery can give us all, newbies and experts alike, plenty of valuable insight.

I caught up with Mary on the telephone last week to ask her a few questions about her background, e-discovery as a field, and E-Discovery Day, as she’ll be participating in a great panel conversation about the technology that’s made it onto her E-Discovery Technology Wishlist, which will be taking place at 1:00 pm EDT/10:00 am PDT on December 4th.

Here’s a lightly edited look at what she had to say.

Q. How did you get started in e-discovery?

My first formal e-discovery role was with Fios in Portland, and that was after about 20 years of working in corporate IT. When I got out of law school, attorneys weren’t all that interested in computers. And they certainly weren’t interested in young attorneys telling them to be interested in computers. So I basically worked at my hobby, which was computers. And I thought it would be for about 10 years before the legal community would catch up with computer technology, but actually, I did that for 20 years until just the beginning of e-discovery.

Q. And do you still see that divide between litigators’ and technical mindsets?

In some ways, we’re still in an early adopter phase now, almost 20 years later, in terms of lawyers embracing computers. I think there’s certainly more of us now. You might call e-discovery “approaching Main Street.” We’ve got technical competence, ethics, and things like that, but I think there’s still a large segment of the legal community that would prefer not to deal with anything technical—maybe other than their cell phone and personal computer.

Q. That really speaks to the need for E-Discovery Day. How do you see E-Discovery Day spreading that message about the need to integrate technology with the practice of the law?

I think E-Discovery Day probably has two functions. One is to bring us together as basically we’re already inside the bubble; we’re inside the e-discovery community. But it’s also an opportunity to bring e-discovery out to the greater community that’s not even lawyers. It’s regular people. Because anybody who deals with the law, like if you’re in a divorce situation, an immigration situation, landlord/tenant situation, a lot of the evidence in these matters will be electronic. E-Discovery Day gives these people an invitation to learn. It’s wall-to-wall education, and I get to engage with our community—a lot of people all in one day.

Q. Who were some of your early influences as you got into e-discovery?

We had quite a group at Fios that basically learned it together. Larry Johnson in Seattle, Michael Rhoden, and Tom Howe. Duane Lites down in Texas had created a bulletin board where you could ask questions, and people would answer, and that was really helpful. And of course George Socha started the EDRM.

Q. You’ll be talking about e-discovery technology on your E-Discovery Day webinar. What are some new technologies you see arising that could have a big impact on e-discovery.

Well I think there can be much better interfaces. I think we’re getting better in our point and click interfaces, but the next frontier of course is voice-activated technology. Can you imagine doing your search and review with a voice interface? I think I saw something just emerged for voice time keeping for attorneys that have to bill by the hour; they can just dictate it. But I think in review, and while you’re searching, there might be some room for a voice interface there.

I would also like to see technology that improved the ease of billing and budgeting in e-discovery, something that would help figure out what a case was worth. Have it hook into your matter management or litigation analytics tools so you could figure out what an average case was worth, the likelihood of winning, what an organization’s metrics for e-discovery costs per person involved. You could build an estimate of what a case would cost to bring it to trial, and offer insight into your possible range of success and range of exposure, allowing a risk manager to make an informed decision.

I’d like to close out this interview with a big thank you to Mary Mack for taking some time out of her busy travel schedule to have this conversation. If you want to hear more of Mary’s thoughts on the bright future of e-discovery technology, sign up for her E-Discovery Day webinar, What’s on Your E-Discovery Technology Wish List? Tech to Keep an Eye on in 2018, at 1:00 pm EDT/10:00 am PDT on E-Discovery Day, December 4, 2018.

ACEDS Community Newsletter for the Week of November 16

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Combining Processes & Technology to Make eDiscovery a Standard Business Procedure
by Mark MacDonald, BIA
Read more

ACEDS New Digital Badge Aims to End E-Discovery Credential Fraud by Frank Ready
Read more

Detroit Symposium/ACEDS Midwest Conference Coverage by Legalnews
Read more

More Current News

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ACEDS Affiliate News

The CJK Group eDiscovery Symposium Tokyo, Japan
Read more

Xact Data Discovery: The Evolving Duty of Technology Competence, eDiscovery
Competence Series Part 1 by Matthew Verga
Read more

CloudNine: Doug Austin – Judge Says “Alexa, Please Testify in a Double
Murder Case”: eDiscovery Trends
Read more

Women in eDiscovery Announces 2019 Conference
Read more

More Affiliate News

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New ACEDS Chapters

We are excited to announce new ACEDS Chapters are being formed in Gulf Coast (LA, MS, AL),
Charleston, South Africa, Toronto, Tokyo, Seattle, Dallas, Columbus, Atlanta, Sydney and Melbourne
Australia. Please reach out to chapters@aceds.org if you are interested in being part of the formation,
steering committee, or a member.

December 3 – Detroit – Annual Holiday Party
Learn more and register here

December 4 – New York – E-Discovery Day Networking Event
Learn more and register here

December 4 – New England – E-Discovery Day Event in Boston
Learn more and register here

December 4 – Jacksonville – E-Discovery Day Event – Save the Date:
More information coming soon!

December 5 – San Francisco – Trifecta Holiday Party
Learn more and register here

December 6 – UK –  eDiscovery Awards 2018
Learn more and register here

Learn More About Chapters

 

 

 

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ACEDS Community Newsletter for the Week of November 8

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Exterro: 5 Tips for Small Legal Departments Performing In-House E-Discovery
by Tim Rollins
Read more

2018 In-House Legal Benchmarking Report Conducted by ACEDS& Exterro
Shows a 19% Jump in Organizations Conducting Work In-House Compared
to Last Year
Read more

Slaughter and May: Regulatory Uses of AI
Read more

Results Are In: The Microsoft Office 365 eDiscovery Challenge Survey
by Bob Ambrogi
Read more

Craig Ball: Mad About Metadata
Read more

Andrew J. Kennedy: Guidelines Emerge with Rise in E-Discovery
of Employee Devices
Read more

More Current News

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ACEDS Affiliate News

Ricoh’s Canadian eDiscovery Group Achieves ISO 9001:2015 Certification
for Quality Management
Read more

Relativity: 4 Barriers Blocking Access to Justice (and How to Help Break Them)
by Sam Bock
Read more

TRU Staffing Partners Receives Two Hall of Fame Awards in 2018 Best of Legal
Times Reader Rankings
Read more

The Master’s Conference – Florida Legal Community: No More “Sleeping Beauty”–
IT IS Time To Learn How Blockchain, Artificial Intelligence, Cybersecurity And More
Will Be Your Magic Kiss To Wake You Up To The 21st Century
Read more

More Affiliate News

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New ACEDS Chapters

We are excited to announce new ACEDS Chapters are being formed in Gulf Coast (LA, MS, AL),
Charleston, South Africa, Toronto, Tokyo, Seattle, Dallas, Columbus, Atlanta, Sydney and Melbourne
Australia. Please reach out to chapters@aceds.org if you are interested in being part of the formation,
steering committee, or a member.

November 8 – San Francisco – Navigating the Shifting Tides of the In-House
E-Discovery Department

Learn more and register here

November 14 – Washington, DC – Cocktail Reception
Learn more and register here

November 14 – New England – The Digital Quid Pro Quo: Regulators, Consumers,
and the Future of Data Privacy and Protection Law
Learn more and register here

December 3 – Detroit – Annual Holiday Party
Learn more and register here

December 4 – New York – E-Discovery Day Networking Event
Learn more and register here

December 5 – San Francisco – Trifecta Holiday Party
Learn more and register here

December 6 – UK –  Holiday Party and 2018 eDiscovery Awards
Learn more and register here

Learn More About Chapters

See the Full List of Upcoming Webinars 

Click Here

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Combining Processes & Technology to Make eDiscovery a Standard Business Procedure

eDiscovery has become a well-established industry, having been used in litigation for nearly two decades now. And whether we want to admit it or not, nearly every case filed has a potential eDiscovery element. So, what do you do if you’re not a Certified e-Discovery Specialist (CEDS) or if this is all a new language for your organization, lawyers or IT department? Hint: Take a deep breath and start identifying people who can help, processes that can be easily implemented and technology that ties it all together.

The knowledge and methods surrounding eDiscovery have grown tremendously through the years, yet many companies and law firms still treat eDiscovery like a fire drill. Running eDiscovery as a reactionary process leads to disruption of the business, increased risks and higher costs. Plus, when it’s not planned for in advance, eDiscovery will likely be handled differently by different people, for each individual matter. That is, the wheel is continually reinvented – the opposite of efficiency.

The good news is that eDiscovery doesn’t have to be that way. With just a little planning, it can be become a standardized, efficient business process. All you need are the right people, the proper workflows and top-of-the-line technology to support it.

The right people…

Contact a reputable eDiscovery company or consultant or request some guidance from your trusted outside counsel. If you are outside counsel, don’t sweat it… there are lots of resources to tap that will help you accomplish your goals – but remember, don’t agree to any deadlines with the opposing side or the court without having some guidance from someone who has done this before – preferably a few thousand times. The number of custodians (i.e., people or things that hold potentially responsive data), amount of data per custodian, ‘other’ sources where that data may reside, electronically stored information (ESI) protocols and other considerations can all become whammies if you’re ‘faking it till you make it.’ We frequently get on calls to help people navigate the eDiscovery rapids. But, just like whitewater, you wouldn’t embark without your guide – and the proper raft.

…combined with the right processes

By creating a detailed, written plan that outlines the steps to take when facing litigation, attorneys can ensure that they follow a consistent procedure for every case. An orderly plan will significantly reduce the stress and chaos associated with the ad hoc approach to eDiscovery. It will also designate specific employees to oversee the process, which will provide clear leadership and consistency for each matter.

Attorney document review is traditionally the most expensive and time-consuming element of eDiscovery, and it can be compounded by how the review is handled. When there is a large amount to review and/or the deadline is coming up fast, it’s common practice to use contract attorneys to assist with the review. However, many times, this decision is made too late.

One of the best ways to increase the efficiency and accuracy and decrease the cost of the attorney document review process is to develop a review standard across all legal matters. Determine what level of case or what number of documents will warrant additional help, and then have a designated team of the same review attorneys – either within your company or outsourced – handle this process on a regular basis.

Doing this will exponentially reduce the time and money it normally takes to find contract attorneys, perform conflict checks, train them on the case and get the review going. In a rush situation, the costs can be compounded. Using the same team of review attorneys also builds institutional knowledge for clients who are involved in frequent litigation, which further improves accuracy and efficiency.

Another way to streamline processes is to recycle processed data and both technical and attorney work product. When the same files and custodians are involved in multiple legal matters, the traditional approach has been to perform separate collections for each case and have different reviews of the same material. Instead, develop a data repository that allows you to reuse relevant work product across different matters – saving a great deal of time and money and simultaneously making the eDiscovery process smoother and more accurate.

…and the right technology tools

If you’re past the point of “ESI for beginners” and are looking to streamline the eDiscovery process, consider using applications that manage legal holds, data preservation, collections, processing and searching – all in one place. Having a single platform to handle these tasks will help automate processes, increase efficiency and cut costs while ensuring you meet necessary compliance obligations. Look for a solution that allows you to easily move your collected and culled data into the review platform of your choice, ensuring you remain in control of your data.

Technology assisted review (TAR) and advanced data analytics tools can be great assets in the eDiscovery process, as they help to dramatically reduce the time and effort required to review data. It is important, however, to understand when TAR may not be the best solution. Using TAR on some types of data, such as spreadsheets, can actually make the review process more difficult and less accurate. By understanding what types of data you’ll typically be handling – whether it’s documents and emails or primarily spreadsheets – you can decide when it makes sense to use TAR and when it doesn’t.

By combining the right tech tools with expert workflows, and backing it all with experienced personnel, eDiscovery can become a regular practice of business. Transforming the chaotic, spur-of-the-moment approach to a consistent, efficient method will result in less confusion and more order for each legal matter.

5 Tips for Small Legal Departments Performing In-House E-Discovery

Exterro and ACEDS recently partnered to survey over 100 members of in-house legal teams for our third annual In-House Legal Benchmarking Report in an effort to better understand how teams are managing and performing litigation services for their organizations. This year, the survey respondents included a wider distribution of companies, ranging from Fortune 500 enterprises to mid-market companies with fewer than 25,000 employees.

With almost 70% of organizations performing the majority of their litigation services in-house, the top-level conclusion was quite clear. As Mary Mack, Executive Director of ACEDS, explains in the report, “You don’t need a large team to provide litigation services effectively.”

While you can (and should!) download the report to get a fuller grasp on the data, ACEDS hosted a webinar on how organizations can use this benchmark data to improve their own processes. While you can listen in to a replay of the webcast here, we’ve distilled that conversation down to [X] key takeaways you can use to understand both how you stack up against your peers and how to improve your efficiency in conducting in-house litigation services.

  1. Focus on the left side of the EDRM first. Data in the report show that legal holds are the most common phase of the e-discovery process to take place in house, with preservation and collection are also fairly commonly performed by in-house teams. Mary Mack explains, “Certainly the left side of the EDRM—information governance, identification, collection aspects—are more aptly handled in-house.”
  2. Limit your external relationships to trusted partners. This lesson applies as much to law firms as to alternative legal service providers (ALSPs). Organizations face challenges around data privacy and the changing regulatory landscape. Potential risk exposure, whether under GDPR or domestic data protections, requires organizations to share information with only trusted entities. Sean Kelly, Senior Director at FTI, observes, “I think that’s primarily why we’re seeing this trend to use fewer external legal services providers as well as outside counsel, because these people are processing and controlling data on behalf of the organization.”
  3. Deepen your relationships with external partners. The complex requirements of understanding data landscapes mean that developing relationships with ALSPs only increases their value. “We don’t want to continue to switch,” Karen Williams, Corporate Counsel for Shamrock Foods, says. “So we will find those subject matter experts, latch onto them, and hopefully they’ll stay in the same firm for a long time and they will just grow in terms of their value to us.”
  4. Leverage best practices to increase efficiency. There’s a wealth of information available on best practices for e-discovery and litigation services in general. Armed with those best practices (and of course the right technology), smaller teams can reach a higher level of efficiency than a larger team. Mark Bowgren, Senior Director at FTI Technology, agrees. “I think that the key thing is implementing strong practices high level within the organization and really letting the technology do the work. I think that if you have an organized dataset that you shouldn’t need a large team of folks, who are potentially overlapping with work or may not have a full understanding of how the technology works. You can optimize the process with a smaller team.”
  5. Iterate and improve your processes continually. Continuous process improvement (also known as Kaizen) has been a business mindset for decades, involving rigorous self-assessment and iterative cycles of incremental improvement—and legal teams can use it too. Mary Mack remembers, “I liked to have a postmortem after every project to make sure that we’ve learned the lessons and didn’t have to repeat them.” Get feedback on how a project went while it’s fresh in your memory, and keep optimizing your process.

While these lessons are all valuable ways to compare your organization to your peers, they’re not the end of the story. So please download Exterro’s and ACEDS’ 2018 In-House Legal Benchmarking Report today, and see what other lessons you can learn to improve your in-house litigation services.